ENHERTU® (fam-trastuzumab deruxtecan-nxki) approved in the US as the first HER2-directed therapy for patients with previously treated HER2-mutant metastatic non-small cell lung cancer

ENHERTU® (fam-trastuzumab deruxtecan-nxki) approved in the US as the first HER2-directed therapy for patients with previously treated HER2-mutant metastatic non-small cell lung cancer




ENHERTU® (fam-trastuzumab deruxtecan-nxki) approved in the US as the first HER2-directed therapy for patients with previously treated HER2-mutant metastatic non-small cell lung cancer

Based on DESTINY-Lung02 results which showed AstraZeneca and Daiichi Sankyo’s ENHERTU reported a confirmed objective response rate of 57.7% in patients with HER2-mutant disease

WILMINGTON, Del.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–AstraZeneca and Daiichi Sankyo’s ENHERTU® (fam-trastuzumab deruxtecan-nxki) has been approved in the US for the treatment of adult patients with unresectable or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors have activating HER2 (ERBB2) mutations, as detected by a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved test, and who have received a prior systemic therapy.

This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on objective response rate (ORR) and duration of response (DoR). Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in a confirmatory trial.

ENHERTU is a specifically engineered HER2-directed antibody drug conjugate (ADC) being jointly developed and commercialized by AstraZeneca and Daiichi Sankyo.

The accelerated approval by the FDA was based on the results from the DESTINY-Lung02 Phase II trial. An interim efficacy analysis in a pre-specified patient cohort showed ENHERTU (5.4mg/kg) demonstrated a confirmed ORR of 57.7% (n=52; 95% confidence interval [CI] 43.2-71.3), as assessed by blinded independent central review (BICR), in patients with previously treated unresectable or metastatic non-squamous HER2-mutant (HER2m) NSCLC. Complete responses (CR) were seen in 1.9% of patients and partial responses (PR) in 55.8% of patients with a median DoR of 8.7 months (95% CI 7.1-NE). Results from the DESTINY-Lung02 trial will be presented at an upcoming medical meeting.

Bob T. Li, MD, PhD, MPH, Medical Oncologist and Physician-Scientist, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, US, said: “The approval of trastuzumab deruxtecan in non-small cell lung cancer is an important milestone for patients and the oncology community. After two decades of research into the role of targeting HER2 in lung cancer, the approval of the first HER2-directed treatment option validates HER2 as an actionable target in lung cancer and marks an important step forward for treating this patient population with unmet medical needs.”

Dave Fredrickson, Executive Vice President, Oncology Business Unit, AstraZeneca, said: “HER2-mutant non-small cell lung cancer is an aggressive form of disease which commonly affects young patients who have faced limited treatment options and a poor prognosis to date. Today’s news provides these patients with the opportunity to benefit from a targeted therapy and highlights the importance of testing for predictive markers, including HER2 in lung cancer, at the time of diagnosis to ensure patients receive the most appropriate treatment for their specific disease.”

Ken Keller, Global Head of Oncology Business, and President and CEO, Daiichi Sankyo, Inc, said: “We are excited that the FDA has granted accelerated approval for ENHERTU for patients with HER2-mutant metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. ENHERTU has now been approved in three different tumor types, underscoring its significant potential across several HER2-targetable tumors. We are continuing to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ENHERTU versus standard chemotherapy in our DESTINY clinical trials in lung cancer.”

The safety of ENHERTU was evaluated in an analysis of 101 patients with unresectable or metastatic HER2m NSCLC who received at least one dose of ENHERTU (5.4mg/kg) in the DESTINY-Lung02 trial. In the analysis, the safety profile of ENHERTU was consistent with previous clinical trials with no new safety concerns identified.

Concurrently with this approval, the FDA also approved companion diagnostic tests to detect HER2 mutations in lung tumor tissue and plasma. This is the third tumor type approved by the FDA for ENHERTU in three years, following approval in breast and gastric cancers. The approval follows the recently received Priority Review in the US as well as the Breakthrough Therapy Designation granted in 2020 by the FDA for this specific type of lung cancer based on the results of the DESTINY-Lung01 trial.

Important Safety Information

Indications

ENHERTU is a HER2-directed antibody and topoisomerase inhibitor conjugate indicated for the treatment of adult patients with:

  • Unresectable or metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer who have received a prior anti-HER2-based regimen either:

    – In the metastatic setting, or

    – In the neoadjuvant or adjuvant setting and have developed disease recurrence during or within six months of completing therapy
  • Unresectable or metastatic HER2-low (IHC 1+ or IHC 2+/ISH-) breast cancer who have received a prior chemotherapy in the metastatic setting or developed disease recurrence during or within 6 months of completing adjuvant chemotherapy

  • Unresectable or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors have activating HER2 (ERBB2) mutations, as detected by an FDA-approved test, and who have received a prior systemic therapy

    This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on objective response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in a confirmatory trial.

  • Locally advanced or metastatic HER2-positive gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma who have received a prior trastuzumab-based regimen

WARNING: INTERSTITIAL LUNG DISEASE and EMBRYO-FETAL TOXICITY

  • Interstitial lung disease (ILD) and pneumonitis, including fatal cases, have been reported with ENHERTU. Monitor for and promptly investigate signs and symptoms including cough, dyspnea, fever, and other new or worsening respiratory symptoms. Permanently discontinue ENHERTU in all patients with Grade 2 or higher ILD/pneumonitis. Advise patients of the risk and to immediately report symptoms.
  • Exposure to ENHERTU during pregnancy can cause embryo-fetal harm. Advise patients of these risks and the need for effective contraception.

Contraindications

None.

Warnings and Precautions

Interstitial Lung Disease / Pneumonitis

Severe, life-threatening, or fatal interstitial lung disease (ILD), including pneumonitis, can occur in patients treated with ENHERTU. A higher incidence of Grade 1 and 2 ILD/pneumonitis has been observed in patients with moderate renal impairment. Advise patients to immediately report cough, dyspnea, fever, and/or any new or worsening respiratory symptoms. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of ILD. Promptly investigate evidence of ILD. Evaluate patients with suspected ILD by radiographic imaging. Consider consultation with a pulmonologist. For asymptomatic ILD/pneumonitis (Grade 1), interrupt ENHERTU until resolved to Grade 0, then if resolved in ≤28 days from date of onset, maintain dose. If resolved in >28 days from date of onset, reduce dose one level. Consider corticosteroid treatment as soon as ILD/pneumonitis is suspected (e.g., ≥0.5 mg/kg/day prednisolone or equivalent). For symptomatic ILD/pneumonitis (Grade 2 or greater), permanently discontinue ENHERTU. Promptly initiate systemic corticosteroid treatment as soon as ILD/pneumonitis is suspected (e.g., ≥1 mg/kg/day prednisolone or equivalent) and continue for at least 14 days followed by gradual taper for at least 4 weeks.

Metastatic Breast Cancer and HER2-Mutant NSCLC (5.4 mg/kg)

In patients with metastatic breast cancer and HER2-mutant NSCLC treated with ENHERTU 5.4 mg/kg, ILD occurred in 12% of patients. Fatal outcomes due to ILD and/or pneumonitis occurred in 1.0% of patients treated with ENHERTU. Median time to first onset was 5 months (range: 0.9 to 23).

Locally Advanced or Metastatic Gastric Cancer (6.4 mg/kg)

In patients with locally advanced or metastatic HER2-positive gastric or GEJ adenocarcinoma treated with ENHERTU 6.4 mg/kg, ILD occurred in 10% of patients. Median time to first onset was 2.8 months (range: 1.2 to 21).

Neutropenia

Severe neutropenia, including febrile neutropenia, can occur in patients treated with ENHERTU. Monitor complete blood counts prior to initiation of ENHERTU and prior to each dose, and as clinically indicated. For Grade 3 neutropenia (Absolute Neutrophil Count [ANC] <1.0 to 0.5 x 109/L), interrupt ENHERTU until resolved to Grade 2 or less, then maintain dose. For Grade 4 neutropenia (ANC <0.5 x 109/L), interrupt ENHERTU until resolved to Grade 2 or less, then reduce dose by one level. For febrile neutropenia (ANC <1.0 x 109/L and temperature >38.3º C or a sustained temperature of ≥38º C for more than 1 hour), interrupt ENHERTU until resolved, then reduce dose by one level.

Metastatic Breast Cancer and HER2-Mutant NSCLC (5.4 mg/kg)

In patients with metastatic breast cancer and HER2-mutant NSCLC treated with ENHERTU 5.4 mg/kg, a decrease in neutrophil count was reported in 65% of patients. Sixteen percent had Grade 3 or 4 decreased neutrophil count. Median time to first onset of decreased neutrophil count was 22 days (range: 2 to 664). Febrile neutropenia was reported in 1.1% of patients.

Locally Advanced or Metastatic Gastric Cancer (6.4 mg/kg)

In patients with locally advanced or metastatic HER2-positive gastric or GEJ adenocarcinoma treated with ENHERTU 6.4 mg/kg, a decrease in neutrophil count was reported in 72% of patients. Fifty-one percent had Grade 3 or 4 decreased neutrophil count. Median time to first onset of decreased neutrophil count was 16 days (range: 4 to 187). Febrile neutropenia was reported in 4.8% of patients.

Left Ventricular Dysfunction

Patients treated with ENHERTU may be at increased risk of developing left ventricular dysfunction. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) decrease has been observed with anti-HER2 therapies, including ENHERTU. Assess LVEF prior to initiation of ENHERTU and at regular intervals during treatment as clinically indicated. Manage LVEF decrease through treatment interruption. When LVEF is >45% and absolute decrease from baseline is 10-20%, continue treatment with ENHERTU. When LVEF is 40-45% and absolute decrease from baseline is <10%, continue treatment with ENHERTU and repeat LVEF assessment within 3 weeks. When LVEF is 40-45% and absolute decrease from baseline is 10-20%, interrupt ENHERTU and repeat LVEF assessment within 3 weeks. If LVEF has not recovered to within 10% from baseline, permanently discontinue ENHERTU. If LVEF recovers to within 10% from baseline, resume treatment with ENHERTU at the same dose. When LVEF is <40% or absolute decrease from baseline is >20%, interrupt ENHERTU and repeat LVEF assessment within 3 weeks. If LVEF of <40% or absolute decrease from baseline of >20% is confirmed, permanently discontinue ENHERTU. Permanently discontinue ENHERTU in patients with symptomatic congestive heart failure. Treatment with ENHERTU has not been studied in patients with a history of clinically significant cardiac disease or LVEF <50% prior to initiation of treatment.

Metastatic Breast Cancer and HER2-Mutant NSCLC (5.4 mg/kg)

In patients with metastatic breast cancer and HER2-mutant NSCLC treated with ENHERTU 5.4 mg/kg, LVEF decrease was reported in 3.6% of patients, of which 0.4% were Grade 3.

Locally Advanced or Metastatic Gastric Cancer (6.4 mg/kg)

In patients with locally advanced or metastatic HER2-positive gastric or GEJ adenocarcinoma treated with ENHERTU 6.4 mg/kg, no clinical adverse events of heart failure were reported; however, on echocardiography, 8% were found to have asymptomatic Grade 2 decrease in LVEF.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity

ENHERTU can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Advise patients of the potential risks to a fetus. Verify the pregnancy status of females of reproductive potential prior to the initiation of ENHERTU. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment and for 7 months after the last dose of ENHERTU. Advise male patients with female partners of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with ENHERTU and for 4 months after the last dose of ENHERTU.

Additional Dose Modifications

Thrombocytopenia

For Grade 3 thrombocytopenia (platelets <50 to 25 x 109/L) interrupt ENHERTU until resolved to Grade 1 or less, then maintain dose. For Grade 4 thrombocytopenia (platelets <25 x 109/L) interrupt ENHERTU until resolved to Grade 1 or less, then reduce dose by one level.

Adverse Reactions

Metastatic Breast Cancer and HER2-Mutant NSCLC (5.4 mg/kg)

The pooled safety population reflects exposure to ENHERTU 5.4 mg/kg intravenously every 3 weeks in 984 patients in Study DS8201-A-J101 (NCT02564900), DESTINY-Breast01, DESTINY-Breast03, DESTINY-Breast04, and DESTINY-Lung02. Among these patients 65% were exposed for >6 months and 39% were exposed for >1 year. In this pooled safety population, the most common (≥20%) adverse reactions, including laboratory abnormalities, were nausea (76%), decreased white blood cell count (71%), decreased hemoglobin (66%), decreased neutrophil count (65%), decreased lymphocyte count (55%), fatigue (54%), decreased platelet count (47%), increased aspartate aminotransferase (48%), vomiting (44%), increased alanine aminotransferase (42%), alopecia (39%), increased blood alkaline phosphatase (39%), constipation (34%), musculoskeletal pain (32%), decreased appetite (32%), hypokalemia (28%), diarrhea (28%), and respiratory infection (24%).

HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

DESTINY-Breast03

The safety of ENHERTU was evaluated in 257 patients with unresectable or metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer who received at least one dose of ENHERTU 5.4 mg/kg intravenously every three weeks in DESTINY-Breast03. The median duration of treatment was 14 months (range: 0.7 to 30).

Serious adverse reactions occurred in 19% of patients receiving ENHERTU. Serious adverse reactions in >1% of patients who received ENHERTU were vomiting, interstitial lung disease, pneumonia, pyrexia, and urinary tract infection. Fatalities due to adverse reactions occurred in 0.8% of patients including COVID-19 and sudden death (one patient each).

ENHERTU was permanently discontinued in 14% of patients, of which ILD/pneumonitis accounted for 8%. Dose interruptions due to adverse reactions occurred in 44% of patients treated with ENHERTU. The most frequent adverse reactions (>2%) associated with dose interruption were neutropenia, leukopenia, anemia, thrombocytopenia, pneumonia, nausea, fatigue, and ILD/pneumonitis. Dose reductions occurred in 21% of patients treated with ENHERTU. The most frequent adverse reactions (>2%) associated with dose reduction were nausea, neutropenia, and fatigue.

The most common (≥20%) adverse reactions, including laboratory abnormalities, were nausea (76%), decreased white blood cell count (74%), decreased neutrophil count (70%), increased aspartate aminotransferase (67%), decreased hemoglobin (64%), decreased lymphocyte count (55%), increased alanine aminotransferase (53%), decreased platelet count (52%), fatigue (49%), vomiting (49%), increased blood alkaline phosphatase (49%), alopecia (37%), hypokalemia (35%), constipation (34%), musculoskeletal pain (31%), diarrhea (29%), decreased appetite (29%), respiratory infection (22%), headache (22%), abdominal pain (21%), increased blood bilirubin (20%), and stomatitis (20%).

HER2-Low Metastatic Breast Cancer

DESTINY-Breast04

The safety of ENHERTU was evaluated in 371 patients with unresectable or metastatic HER2-low (IHC 1+ or IHC 2+/ISH-) breast cancer who received ENHERTU 5.4 mg/kg intravenously every 3 weeks in DESTINY-Breast04. The median duration of treatment was 8 months (range: 0.2 to 33) for patients who received ENHERTU.

Serious adverse reactions occurred in 28% of patients receiving ENHERTU. Serious adverse reactions in >1% of patients who received ENHERTU were ILD/pneumonitis, pneumonia, dyspnea, musculoskeletal pain, sepsis, anemia, febrile neutropenia, hypercalcemia, nausea, pyrexia, and vomiting. Fatalities due to adverse reactions occurred in 4% of patients including ILD/pneumonitis (3 patients); sepsis (2 patients); and ischemic colitis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, dyspnea, febrile neutropenia, general physical health deterioration, pleural effusion, and respiratory failure (1 patient each).

ENHERTU was permanently discontinued in 16% of patients, of which ILD/pneumonitis accounted for 8%. Dose interruptions due to adverse reactions occurred in 39% of patients treated with ENHERTU. The most frequent adverse reactions (>2%) associated with dose interruption were neutropenia, fatigue, anemia, leukopenia, COVID-19, ILD/pneumonitis, increased transaminases, and hyperbilirubinemia. Dose reductions occurred in 23% of patients treated with ENHERTU. The most frequent adverse reactions (>2%) associated with dose reduction were fatigue, nausea, thrombocytopenia, and neutropenia.

The most common (≥20%) adverse reactions, including laboratory abnormalities, were nausea (76%), decreased white blood cell count (70%), decreased hemoglobin (64%), decreased neutrophil count (64%), decreased lymphocyte count (55%), fatigue (54%), decreased platelet count (44%), alopecia (40%), vomiting (40%), increased aspartate aminotransferase (38%), increased alanine aminotransferase (36%), constipation (34%), increased blood alkaline phosphatase (34%), decreased appetite (32%), musculoskeletal pain (32%), diarrhea (27%), and hypokalemia (25%).

Unresectable or Metastatic HER2-Mutant NSCLC (5.4 mg/kg)

DESTINY-Lung02 evaluated two dose levels (5.4 mg/kg [n=101] and 6.4 mg/kg [n=50]); however, only the results for the recommended dose of 5.4 mg/kg intravenously every 3 weeks are described below due to increased toxicity observed with the higher dose in patients with NSCLC, including ILD/pneumonitis.

The safety of ENHERTU was evaluated in 101 patients with unresectable or metastatic HER2-mutant NSCLC who received ENHERTU 5.4 mg/kg intravenously every three weeks in DESTINY‑Lung02. Nineteen percent of patients were exposed for >6 months.

Serious adverse reactions occurred in 30% of patients receiving ENHERTU. Serious adverse reactions in >1% of patients who received ENHERTU were ILD/pneumonitis, thrombocytopenia, dyspnea, nausea, pleural effusion, and increased troponin I. Fatality occurred in 1 patient with suspected ILD/pneumonitis (1%).

ENHERTU was permanently discontinued in 8% of patients. Adverse reactions which resulted in permanent discontinuation of ENHERTU were ILD/pneumonitis, diarrhea, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, myocarditis, and vomiting. Dose interruptions of ENHERTU due to adverse reactions occurred in 23% of patients. Adverse reactions which required dose interruption (>2%) included neutropenia and ILD/pneumonitis. Dose reductions due to an adverse reaction occurred in 11% of patients.

The most common (≥20%) adverse reactions, including laboratory abnormalities, were nausea (61%), decreased white blood cell count (60%), decreased hemoglobin (58%), decreased neutrophil count (52%), decreased lymphocyte count (43%), decreased platelet count (40%), decreased albumin (39%), increased aspartate aminotransferase (35%), increased alanine aminotransferase (34%), fatigue (32%), constipation (31%), decreased appetite (30%), vomiting (26%), increased alkaline phosphatase (22%), and alopecia (21%).

Locally Advanced or Metastatic Gastric Cancer (6.4 mg/kg)

The safety of ENHERTU was evaluated in 187 patients with locally advanced or metastatic HER2-positive gastric or GEJ adenocarcinoma in DESTINY-Gastric01. Patients intravenously received at least one dose of either ENHERTU (N=125) 6.4 mg/kg every 3 weeks or either irinotecan (N=55) 150 mg/m2 biweekly or paclitaxel (N=7) 80 mg/m2 weekly for 3 weeks. The median duration of treatment was 4.6 months (range: 0.7 to 22.3) for patients who received ENHERTU.

Serious adverse reactions occurred in 44% of patients receiving ENHERTU 6.4 mg/kg. Serious adverse reactions in >2% of patients who received ENHERTU were decreased appetite, ILD, anemia, dehydration, pneumonia, cholestatic jaundice, pyrexia, and tumor hemorrhage. Fatalities due to adverse reactions occurred in 2.4% of patients: disseminated intravascular coagulation, large intestine perforation, and pneumonia occurred in one patient each (0.8%).

ENHERTU was permanently discontinued in 15% of patients, of which ILD accounted for 6%. Dose interruptions due to adverse reactions occurred in 62% of patients treated with ENHERTU. The most frequent adverse reactions (>2%) associated with dose interruption were neutropenia, anemia, decreased appetite, leukopenia, fatigue, thrombocytopenia, ILD, pneumonia, lymphopenia, upper respiratory tract infection, diarrhea, and hypokalemia. Dose reductions occurred in 32% of patients treated with ENHERTU. The most frequent adverse reactions (>2%) associated with dose reduction were neutropenia, decreased appetite, fatigue, nausea, and febrile neutropenia.

The most common (≥20%) adverse reactions, including laboratory abnormalities, were decreased hemoglobin (75%), decreased white blood cell count (74%), decreased neutrophil count (72%), decreased lymphocyte count (70%), decreased platelet count (68%), nausea (63%), decreased appetite (60%), increased aspartate aminotransferase (58%), fatigue (55%), increased blood alkaline phosphatase (54%), increased alanine aminotransferase (47%), diarrhea (32%), hypokalemia (30%), vomiting (26%), constipation (24%), increased blood bilirubin (24%), pyrexia (24%), and alopecia (22%).

Use in Specific Populations

  • Pregnancy: ENHERTU can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Advise patients of the potential risks to a fetus. There are clinical considerations if ENHERTU is used in pregnant women, or if a patient becomes pregnant within 7 months after the last dose of ENHERTU.
  • Lactation: There are no data regarding the presence of ENHERTU in human milk, the effects on the breastfed child, or the effects on milk production. Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in a breastfed child, advise women not to breastfeed during treatment with ENHERTU and for 7 months after the last dose.
  • Females and Males of Reproductive Potential: Pregnancy testing: Verify pregnancy status of females of reproductive potential prior to initiation of ENHERTU. Contraception: Females: ENHERTU can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with ENHERTU and for 7 months after the last dose. Males: Advise male patients with female partners of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with ENHERTU and for 4 months after the last dose. Infertility: ENHERTU may impair male reproductive function and fertility.
  • Pediatric Use: Safety and effectiveness of ENHERTU have not been established in pediatric patients.
  • Geriatric Use: Of the 883 patients with breast cancer treated with ENHERTU 5.4 mg/kg, 22% were ≥65 years and 3.6% were ≥75 years. No overall differences in efficacy within clinical studies were observed between patients ≥65 years of age compared to younger patients. There was a higher incidence of Grade 3-4 adverse reactions observed in patients aged ≥65 years (60%) as compared to younger patients (48%).

Contacts

Media Inquiries
Brendan McEvoy + 302 885 2677

Jessica McDuell + 302 885 2677

US Media Mailbox: usmediateam@astrazeneca.com

Read full story here